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Category Archives: Technology in Education

While most kids in most situations are making the right choices, there are subgroups who are at greater risk of bad experiences. New research puts lower numbers on sexting and other dangerous acts. Guest blog post at iKeepSafe.

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One of my take-aways from the Encore 2011 conference came during a keynote speech by Peter Sims, entrepreneur and author of Little Bets: How Breakthrough Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries.

Through his research, he’s found that the great thinkers, innovators, creators take a methodical course of small steps, making “affordable little bets,” rather than beginning with a fully formed great idea. They fail quickly and learn fast. They make adaptations and improvements. They take ideas and experiment with them in incremental steps, analyzing what went right and wrong.

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At the Encore 2011 Conference last night, former US Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor delivered the keynote speech at the Purpose Prize Awards. In her remarks, she painted a vivid picture of how ignorant Americans have become about how our government works.

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October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month. This year’s theme is Our Shared Responsibility. As explained by the National Cyber Security Alliance, “no individual, business, or government entity is solely responsible for securing the Internet. Everyone has a role in securing their part of cyberspace, including the devices and networks they use. We need to understand that individual actions have a collective impact and when we use the Internet safely we make it more secure for everyone.”

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Sameer Hinduja, Ph.D., Co-Director of the Cyberbullying Research Center and Associate Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Florida Atlantic University, recently wrote another in a series of blog posts about cell phone and mobile devices in schools. In this post, Sameer points out why “even with a suspected or actual policy violation by a student, it may not be in your school’s best interests to seize that student’s device.”

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Are you one of the 40 million people who’ve watched one of the Did You Know? (Shift Happens) videos? If so, you’ll know why they’re so popular and you can probably imagine using it as part of a thought-provoking activity in a faculty meeting or professional development seminar.

Scott McLeod, J.D. , Ph. D., an associate professor of Educational Leadership at the University of Kentucky, a former winner of a Cable’s Leaders in Learning Award, and the Founding Director of the UCEA Center for the Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education (CASTLE), had those thoughts and so he again collaborated with Karl Fisch (who started the Did You Know?

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As we approach the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks of 9/11, many of our cable network partners are planning to air commemorative programs, produce curricula, and create online resources that will help children and adults reflect on the causes and impact of that sad and harrowing day. Cable in the Classroom has compiled a list of these resources here. E-School News lists a varied collection of resources here.

It’s worth noting that many of the children now going back to school were not even born in 2001, and many of the rest were too young to understand what was happening.

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Maps are both a reflection of and a way to shape the way we see the world.  We don’t often give much thought to how they are constructed, yet maps are media too, just as surely as TV and websites.  And, as with other media, maps are carefully created, two-dimensional representations of the physical world that tell a story using tools and techniques unique to the medium, cartography.  Their creators made a series of decisions about what to include, which techniques to use, and what to emphasize. 

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In a commentary in Education Week, Jim Bosco and Keith Kreuger of the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) call for a switch in thinking from the outdated and negative approach of traditional acceptable-use policies (AUPs) for technology use in schools towards a more positive and proactive responsible-use orientation.

Most AUPs were created in the one-way world of Web 1.0 or in the early stages of the two-way Web 2.0 environment. They were devised to protect kids from harm being done to them by exposure to inappropriate content, conduct, or contacts.

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I recently came across two things that got me thinking about America’s strikingly high dropout rate and what the media and telecommunications industry has done to encourage kids to either drop out or stay in school.

The first instance was some information that came my way about a Get Schooled event in Chicago. The second was an article1 for a communications law journal about telecommunications technology, digital literacy, and America’s high dropout rate written by Michael Powell, the President and CEO of the National Cable and Telecommunications Association (NCTA).

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