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Category Archives: Leaders in Learning

What objects, once common place in education, are now obsolete? The smell of a freshly printed mimeograph worksheet? A filmstrip machine?

Technology advances make some new things possible and make some old things useless. In our personal and professional lives, we’ve seen this over and over.

Business Insider ran a list of 21 things that became obsolete during the first decade of the 21st Century. The list included video rental stores (like Blockbuster), PDAs (replace by smart phones), road maps (replace by GPS devices and Google Maps on smart phones).

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Page Harrington, Executive Director of the Sewall-Belmont House & Museum, home of the historic National Woman’s Party, reflects on Women’s History Month, the 100th anniversary of the Woman Suffrage Parade of 1913 and how sufffragists used a sort of social media of their own.

There have been great articles celebrating, remembering and raising awareness of women’s issues as part of Women’s History month. Whether 100 years ago or today, the disenfranchised still struggle to break-through and have their voices heard amongst the hyper-chatter inside the Beltway, Washington, DC.

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Sometimes the patterns in a data set or in an artwork are more easily discerned when we change the orientation from which we view it. And sometimes flipping accepted practice upside down lets us see things in a fresh, new way. There has been a lot written about flipped classrooms, but this is about something different: flipping Bloom’s Taxonomy.

When I was in graduate school, Bloom’s Taxonomy ruled. Created in the 1950’s, the taxonomy was a framework to describe and classify different learning objectives teachers might set for students.

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By Belinha De Abreu

In a recent article, Larry Rosen noted that technology was making kids “driven to distraction.” The buzz of an incoming text or the desire to check Facebook was keeping students from extended concentration and deep thinking. In my own practice, I’ve noticed that it’s getting more difficult to get students to think deeply about an idea. From my perspective students are not routinely asked to do much original thinking. For assignments, they are usually given a topic and then told which technology tool to use, and what the expected result should look like.

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The community of media literacy educators lost a friend, mentor, leader, scholar, author, and, most of all, a teacher. Barry Duncan passed away June 6th after a long battle with Parkinsons. Coincidentally, the great science fiction writer Ray Bradbury died the day before.

Both were icons and visionaries who had outsized influence on their fields.

Bradbury’s The Martian Chronicles and Farenheit 451 became instant classics that became movies and part of popular culture. Both also made important comments about science, society, and people.

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Wednesday, February 1st will be the inaugural Digital Learning Day. Conceived by the Alliance for Excellent Education, Digital Learning Day is the “culminating event of a year-round national awareness campaign to improve teaching and learning for all children” through the practical and effective use of digital technologies. Highlighting the many roles media and digital technology can play in improving learning comes at a particularly opportune time, given two recent negative articles about educational technology in the New York Times.

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Are you one of the 40 million people who’ve watched one of the Did You Know? (Shift Happens) videos? If so, you’ll know why they’re so popular and you can probably imagine using it as part of a thought-provoking activity in a faculty meeting or professional development seminar.

Scott McLeod, J.D. , Ph. D., an associate professor of Educational Leadership at the University of Kentucky, a former winner of a Cable’s Leaders in Learning Award, and the Founding Director of the UCEA Center for the Advanced Study of Technology Leadership in Education (CASTLE), had those thoughts and so he again collaborated with Karl Fisch (who started the Did You Know?

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One of the hallmarks of good teachers is that they will do almost anything, use almost anything, try almost anything to make learning come alive for their students. Sometimes that includes the creative use of media and technology. Sometimes that includes drawing direct connections between what students are learning and elements of their daily lives or aspects of their community. Sometimes that means immersing students in an activity.

We often see examples of wonderful educators using multimedia technology to bring a subject to life or impressive examples of students not just learning, but actually doing history or science.

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